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21 News Items found

In the Lab

Can Stem Cells Be Taught to Repair a Radiation-Damaged Brain?

In a recent study, Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists used stem-cell engineering to repair brain injuries in rats. The results raise hope for future therapies that could prevent or fix nerve damage in cancer patients who need brain radiation.

Fibrous extensions of a nerve cell (red) and an oligodendrocyte (green) growing on top of the nerve cell

In the Lab

Disorderly DNA: Researchers Simulate a Common Cause of Lung Cancer

MSK scientists have created a mouse model that replicates a subtype of non-small cell lung cancer caused by a chromosomal rearrangement.

Cancer biologist Andrea Ventura

In the Lab

A New Mouse? Genetically Pliable Stem Cells Could Advance Research on Many Diseases

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed a powerful new way to study human disease using stem cells whose genomes can be manipulated at will.

Lab mouse with cultured human pluripotent stem cells

Decoder

What Is Tumor Heterogeneity?

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Gum ball machines

In the Lab

Researchers Reveal How Tumors Manipulate Certain Immune Cells to Their Own Advantage

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Activated macrophage

Decoder

What Is Apoptosis?

Cell biologist Michael Overholtzer explains apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death that can lead to cancer when it doesn’t function properly.

Pictured: Liver Cells

Announcement

Memorial Sloan Kettering Launches New Center for Molecular Imaging and Nanotechnology

The new center brings together scientists and clinicians working in various fields who will use the power of imaging to speed research and innovations in cancer care.

Pictured: Jason Lewis, Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis & Daniel Heller

Snapshot

Not So Fast: Dividing Cells Use a “Speed Limit” to Avoid Genetic Mistakes

The discovery of a molecular process that slows down cell division could provide new understanding about how some cancers develop.

Pictured: Human cell nucleus

In the Lab

Holding On and Hiding Out: How Cancer Cells Spread to the Brain and Thrive

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel

In the Lab

Immune Cells in the Brain Could be Enlisted to Fight Glioblastoma

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers say a drug that acts on noncancerous, tumor-infiltrating cells might provide a new treatment option for the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer.

Mouse glioblastoma tumor with phagocytic macrophages