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17 News Items found

In the Lab

Researchers Fast-Forward Stem Cell Aging to Study Degenerative Diseases

A team of Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists has come up with an approach to make stem-cell-derived neurons rapidly age in a cell culture dish. The breakthrough could transform research into Parkinson’s and other late-onset diseases.

Pictured: Stem cell-derived nerve cells exposed to progerin

In the News

Cancer Immunotherapy Named Science Magazine “Breakthrough of the Year”

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have played a major role in cancer immunotherapy research, named “Breakthrough of the Year” by Science magazine.

Pictured: T cells

In the Clinic

Cell-Based Immune Therapy Shows Promise in Leukemia Patients

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have used genetically modified immune cells to eradicate cancer in five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens

In the Lab

New Technique Could Make Cell-Based Immune Therapies for Cancer Safer and More Effective

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have reported a new method that could allow the development of more-specific, cell-based therapies for cancer.

Pictured: Michel Sadelain

Announcement

Memorial Sloan Kettering Researchers Appointed to Stand Up To Cancer Immunology “Dream Team”

Physician-scientists Michel Sadelain and Jedd Wolchok have been appointed to a new research team dedicated to investigating ways to harness the immune system to fight cancer.

Pictured: Michel Sadelain & Jedd Wolchok

Q&A

Developmental Biologist Lorenz Studer Comments on the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Methods to generate stem cells have given scientists new ways to study some diseases and identify potential drugs, and could one day be used to rebuild diseased or damaged tissues in patients.

Pictured: Lorenz Studer

Feature

Cell-Based Therapies Show Promise

Years of innovative research, technology development, and facility expansion at Memorial Sloan Kettering have led to several new experimental treatments for people with cancer.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens