and/or

19 News Items found

Feature

How a Chicken Helped Solve the Mystery of Cancer

When this feathered patient found her way into a New York laboratory in 1909, she changed the course of cancer science.

A barred Plymouth Rock hen

Science Byte

PSMA: A New Target for Prostate Cancer Treatment

Researchers have discovered how a high level of the protein PSMA in cells helps fuel prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer cells, colored red in scanning electron micrograph (SEM).

In the Lab

New Study Shows How Wayward Chromosomes Get Back on Track

MSK researchers are learning how cells are able to recognize and correct errors that occur during cell division.

A cell in the process of dividing

In the Lab

Studying Cancer Mysteries Just Beneath the Scales

Hail to the zebrafish. MSK scientists are using a small fish to answer some big questions about cancer.

Pictured: Casper zebrafish

Q&A

Picturing the Body’s Immune Response

Cell biologist Philipp Niethammer discusses what the zebrafish can teach us about how the body heals.

In the Lab

Manipulating a Single Gene Turns Colorectal Cancer Cells Back to Normal

For the first time, scientists have shown that the gene APC, which is mutated in the vast majority of colorectal cancers, might be a promising target for future therapies.

Organoid cell structures fluorescing in blue, green, and purple.

In the Lab

Outsmarting Cancer’s Survival Skills

A new study led by MSK investigators reveals how some cancer cells become resistant to targeted treatment and suggests what might be done to stop that from happening.

MSK investigators Joan Massagué and Anna Obenauf

Announcement

Expanding the Impact of Precision Medicine to Fuel Discoveries

MSK’s Functional Genomics Initiative will enable basic scientists to take full advantage of the massive amount of data produced by tumor sequencing.

Christina Leslie and John Petrini

In the Lab

Can Stem Cells Be Taught to Repair a Radiation-Damaged Brain?

In a recent study, Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists used stem-cell engineering to repair brain injuries in rats. The results raise hope for future therapies that could prevent or fix nerve damage in cancer patients who need brain radiation.

Fibrous extensions of a nerve cell (red) and an oligodendrocyte (green) growing on top of the nerve cell

In the Lab

Disorderly DNA: Researchers Simulate a Common Cause of Lung Cancer

For the first time, Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists have created a mouse model that replicates a subtype of non-small cell lung cancer caused by a chromosomal rearrangement — a type of mutation that is common in cancers but thus far has been very difficult to study.

Cancer biologist Andrea Ventura