Recent News

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7 News Items found

In Brief

Can You Hear Me Now? Scientists Find Nanoparticles Have a Language of Their Own

Nanoparticles were thought of a silent partner in imaging technologies. They’re now being recognized as an important source of subatomic chatter.

MSK light bright image

In the Lab

Special Delivery: Nano-Size Particles Carry Personalized Medicines to Cancer’s Doorstep

Using computer intelligence, scientists are building drug-loaded nanoparticles that deliver a knockout blow to cancer.

MSK chemist Daniel Heller with models of his nanoparticles

In the Lab

Detective Work: How Implantable Nanosensors Could Monitor Cancer Activity

Learn how tiny sensors made of nanotubes could serve as implantable devices that offer a noninvasive way to monitor cancer and its treatments.

Wearable device on woman’s arm with labels indicating beams going into nanotubes and coming back out for analysis.

In the Lab

Miniature Device Could Unlock the Promise of Some Kidney Cancer Drugs

Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists have engineered a tiny particle that could ferry drugs directly to the kidneys and prevent their uptake in other organs.

Proximal tubule of the kidney.

Announcement

Memorial Sloan Kettering Launches New Center for Molecular Imaging and Nanotechnology

The new center brings together scientists and clinicians working in various fields who will use the power of imaging to speed research and innovations in cancer care.

Pictured: Jason Lewis, Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis & Daniel Heller

Video

Tiny Solutions for Big Problems: A Visit to the Lab of Daniel Heller

The research team of chemist and engineer Daniel Heller creates new nanoscale materials that are specially designed to improve biological research or solve clinical problems.

Pictured: Daniel Heller

In the Lab

Faster than the Speed of Light: New Imaging Approach Could Measure Tumor Activity

A new imaging approach being investigated by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers could provide better information about a tumor’s molecular activity, allowing for a more accurate diagnosis.

Pictured: Daniel Thorek & Jan Grimm