Recent News: Hematologic Malignancies

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16 News Items found

In The Lab

Ro Versus Musashi: How One Molecule Can Turn Cancer Cells Back to Normal

Researchers identify a compound that appears to eliminate tumor cells in a dish and in mice.

An illustration of a samurai and a crab.

In the Lab

Something New Under the Sun: Study in Leukemia Finds Role for Helios Protein

MSK researchers have found that a protein that contributes to one type of leukemia when it’s missing can lead to the formation of a different leukemia type when it’s present.

An illustration shows Helios, the ancient Greek sun god, unwinding DNA

Announcement

FDA Approves Enasidenib (Idhifa), a First-of-Its-Kind Drug, for Advanced Blood Cancer

A new treatment option for people with acute myeloid leukemia is available, and it works in an unconventional way.

Acute myeloid leukemia cells under a microscope

In the Lab

Step by Step: Stem Cell Approach Provides New Models for Studying How Acute Myeloid Leukemia Progresses

A new laboratory tool will allow researchers to study the progression from normal cells to myelodysplastic syndromes to an aggressive type of leukemia.

Histology images of stem cells and AML cells

In the Clinic

The Evolution of a Lifesaving Drug: A Scientist Reflects

Physician-scientist Charles Sawyers played a pivotal role in the development of Gleevec, one of the first successful targeted drugs for cancer.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers

Decoder

What Is Epigenetics?

Physician-scientist Omar Abdel-Wahab explains epigenetics, a growing field based on the study of genetic changes that are not part of the DNA code, and how it relates to cancer.

DNA wrapped around histones

In the Lab

Compound from Tropical Plant Targets Key Cancer-Causing Genes

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found a naturally occurring compound that can destroy cancer cells in mice by targeting MYC, a cancer-causing gene that has remained elusive until now.

An origami crane illustrates the importance of RNA folding for regulating gene translation. The bolded sequences on the crane’s wings indicate the portion that is critical for the manufacture of many cancer-causing proteins.

In the Lab

Bacteria May Hold the Key to Preventing Dangerous Side Effect of Transplants

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq

In the Clinic

New Trial Advances Cell-Based Immune Therapy for Certain Leukemias

A new study evaluating a cell-based immune therapy to treat an aggressive type of leukemia — the largest study of its kind to date — reports that 88 percent of patients responded to the treatment.

Pictured: Renier Brentjens, Isabelle Rivière & Michel Sadelain

In the News

Cancer Immunotherapy Named Science Magazine “Breakthrough of the Year”

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have played a major role in cancer immunotherapy research, named “Breakthrough of the Year” by Science magazine.

Pictured: T cells